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yup-that-exists:

Suit Pyjamas
Made famous by Barney Stinson from show How I Met Your Mother, these suit pyjamas actually exist and are for sale! Although they may look like something you wouldn’t want to wear to bed, they are actually made from a silk/cotton blend that is 100% breathable and comfy. Guaranteed to boost awesomeness!
BUY IT HERE

yup-that-exists:

Suit Pyjamas

Made famous by Barney Stinson from show How I Met Your Mother, these suit pyjamas actually exist and are for sale! Although they may look like something you wouldn’t want to wear to bed, they are actually made from a silk/cotton blend that is 100% breathable and comfy. Guaranteed to boost awesomeness!

BUY IT HERE

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dailylaughter4u:

Hilarious and Worst Eye Makeup Fails: Check out these crazy eye makeup fails http://ichirokanami.tinycontentbytes.me/hilarious-and-worst-eye-makeup-fails

dailylaughter4u:

Hilarious and Worst Eye Makeup Fails: Check out these crazy eye makeup fails http://ichirokanami.tinycontentbytes.me/hilarious-and-worst-eye-makeup-fails

(Source: s-media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com)

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(via picsinframes)

omg-humor:

Best way to make a point

omg-humor:

Best way to make a point

5secondsofteasing:

This website… I can’t

hush-little-heart:

Say whaaaaaaaa

hush-little-heart:

Say whaaaaaaaa

scienceyoucanlove:

Via BPoDThis brain is the source of great knowledge. But its owner woke up every day with no idea how important he was. It belonged to Henry Molaison, who lost his ability to make new memories after he had brain surgery in 1953 to cure his epilepsy. After that, any new experience left his brain within minutes. He was a willing subject of study throughout his life (perhaps never tiring of the novelty of research), and much of our knowledge about how and where the brain forms and stores memories came from him. When he died, he donated his brain to science. It was meticulously dissected, and has now been digitally reconstructed. The 3D virtual model has been made available for free to researchers who can inspect his unique mind in greater detail than ever before, meaning that the work can continue, and ensuring that Henry Molaison will never be forgotten.Written by Anthony Lewis
from NWF

scienceyoucanlove:

Via BPoD

This brain is the source of great knowledge. But its owner woke up every day with no idea how important he was. It belonged to Henry Molaison, who lost his ability to make new memories after he had brain surgery in 1953 to cure his epilepsy. After that, any new experience left his brain within minutes. He was a willing subject of study throughout his life (perhaps never tiring of the novelty of research), and much of our knowledge about how and where the brain forms and stores memories came from him. When he died, he donated his brain to science. It was meticulously dissected, and has now been digitally reconstructed. The 3D virtual model has been made available for free to researchers who can inspect his unique mind in greater detail than ever before, meaning that the work can continue, and ensuring that Henry Molaison will never be forgotten.

Written by Anthony Lewis

from NWF

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants
After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.
The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.
So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.
Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.
"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."
Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.
Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.
Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.

neuromorphogenesis:

Canadian student has “out of body experiences” whenever she wants

After attending a lecture on “out of body experiences,” a 24-year-old student from the University of Ottawa approached her professor saying, “I thought everybody could do that.” She can apparently do this at will — making her the first person with this condition to be studied.

The resulting paper, which now appears in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, describes the condition as something of an illusion, where a person’s ability to track their body’s position in space and time has somehow become externalized. In this extraordinary case, the university student claims she can do this whenever she wants — to induce the feeling that she can experience her body moving outside the boundaries of her physical body, while remaining aware of her unmoving physical body.

So, if you’re a neuroscientist studying this particular person, what do you do? You put her in a brain scanner, of course. Writing in ABC News, Gillian Mohney explains more:

[Claude] Messier and his co-author interviewed the student and had her undergo an MRI to see if her brain activity might shed light on her unusual ability.

Messier said the girl first noticed her ability when she was a child and had a hard time going to sleep during naps. To pass the time she would “float” above her body.

"I feel myself moving, or, more accurately, can make myself feel as if I am moving. I know perfectly well that I am not actually moving," the student told the researchers. "In fact, I am hyper-sensitive to my body at that point, because I am concentrating so hard on the sensation of moving…For example, if I ‘spin’ for long enough, I get dizzy."

Messier said at some point the student’s brain showed similar activity to that of a high-level athlete who can vividly imagine themselves winning a competition. One difference, however, was that her brain activity was focused on one side, and the athletes usually show activity on both brain hemispheres.

Messier said more study was needed, but he said that this discovery could mean many more people have this ability but find it “unremarkable.” The discovery could be similar to how synesthesia, a mix of multiple senses, was discovered in a wider population.

Alternately, the ability could be something that everyone is able to do as an infant or child, but lose as they get older.

Wild stuff. Typically, this condition happens as the result of an injury, psychological illness, lesions on the brain, or from a drug that induces the illusion. The researchers speculate that this ability might be present in infancy but that it’s lost without regular practice. They also hypothesize that it’s more prevalent in young people… and that it’s a skill that might be developed.

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

policymic:

How many Earth twins are out there? Hundreds possibly

NASA’s recent discovery of Kepler-186f, the first habitable Earth-sized planet is big news in humankind’s long search for extraterrestrial life.

A universe full of exoplanets: Thanks to the Kepler Space Telescope, which was launched in 2009 to hunt planets across the universe, we’ve managed to find around 1800 exoplanets so far, many of which have been discovered in just the last year or so.

Read moreFollow policymic

(via infinity-imagined)

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yup-that-exists:

Coffee Table Aquarium 
Welcome to the 21st century, where instead of inventing something original, we just combine two things that that already exist to make something awesome. The coffee table aquarium holds 25 gallons of water and comes with everything you need to get started except the water and fish. The perfect luxury item to spice up your living room.
BUY IT HERE

yup-that-exists:

Coffee Table Aquarium 

Welcome to the 21st century, where instead of inventing something original, we just combine two things that that already exist to make something awesome. The coffee table aquarium holds 25 gallons of water and comes with everything you need to get started except the water and fish. The perfect luxury item to spice up your living room.

BUY IT HERE

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because I should be able to feel safe when taking the five minute walk from school to home.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because I should be able to feel safe when taking the five minute walk from school to home.

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because when I reported being called a slut and a whore by a male classmate, I was told:

  • He probably likes you
  • Boys will be boys
  • Well, maybe you should’t wear that shirt

All by teachers. I was twelve.